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I think we should decide on some basic criteria so if someone says, "I want to contribute to the blog," we'll have those as guidelines to point to.

For example: the project should beFor example: publicThe project should be public, and we should not be a primary distribution point or main reference., and we should not be a primary distribution point or main reference. In other words, it should be a project that is already hosted online somewhere, even if it is just github or sourceforge. This way the blogs can be restricted to a reasonably concise description/discussion, including external links to downloads, documentation, etc. If If it's proprietary, that's fine, but it should still have a home page somewhere else. This draws a line such that 'programming diary' style things would not be allowed ("I'm working on whatever, and it's not really done yet...") etc.means:

  • The blogs can be restricted to a reasonably concise description/discussion, including external links to downloads, documentation, etc.

  • 'Programming diary' style things would not be allowed ("I'm working on whatever, and it's not really done yet, but here's how it's been going...") etc.


Another idea: We might also considercould create some kind of optionaloptional template. People could use this to structure their blog, but would not be required to use it, and could interpret it as they wish.

I think we should decide on some basic criteria so if someone says, "I want to contribute to the blog," we'll have those as guidelines to point to.

For example: the project should be public, and we should not be a primary distribution point or main reference. In other words, it should be a project that is already hosted online somewhere, even if it is just github or sourceforge. This way the blogs can be restricted to a reasonably concise description/discussion, including external links to downloads, documentation, etc. If it's proprietary, that's fine, but it should still have a home page. This draws a line such that 'programming diary' style things would not be allowed ("I'm working on whatever, and it's not really done yet...") etc.

We might also consider some kind of optional template. People could use this to structure their blog, but would not be required to use it.

I think we should decide on some basic criteria so if someone says, "I want to contribute to the blog," we'll have those as guidelines to point to.

For example: The project should be public, and we should not be a primary distribution point or main reference. In other words, it should be a project that is already hosted online somewhere, even if it is just github or sourceforge. If it's proprietary, that's fine, but it should still have a home page somewhere else. This means:

  • The blogs can be restricted to a reasonably concise description/discussion, including external links to downloads, documentation, etc.

  • 'Programming diary' style things would not be allowed ("I'm working on whatever, and it's not really done yet, but here's how it's been going...") etc.


Another idea: We could create some kind of optional template. People could use this to structure their blog, but would not be required to use it, and could interpret it as they wish.

2 deleted 2 characters in body
source | link

I think we should decide on some basic criteria so if someone says, "I want to contribute to the blog," we'll have some basicthose as guidelines to point to.

For example: the project should be publicpublic, butand we should not be a primary distribution point or main reference. In other words, it should be a project that is already hosted online somewhere, even if it is just github or sourceforge. This way the blogs can be restricted to a reasonably concise description/discussion, including external links to downloads, documentation, etc. If it's proprietary, that's fine, but it should still have a home page. This draws a line such that 'programming diary' style things would not be allowed ("I'm working on whatever, and it's not really done yet...") etc.

We might also consider some kind of optional template. People could use this to structure their blog, but would not be required to use it.

I think we should decide on some basic criteria so if someone says, "I want to contribute to the blog," we'll have some basic guidelines to point to.

For example: the project should be public, but we should not be a primary distribution point or main reference. In other words, it should be a project that is already hosted online somewhere, even if it is just github or sourceforge. This way the blogs can be restricted to a reasonably concise description/discussion, including external links to downloads, documentation, etc.

We might also consider some kind of optional template. People could use this to structure their blog, but would not be required to use it.

I think we should decide on some basic criteria so if someone says, "I want to contribute to the blog," we'll have those as guidelines to point to.

For example: the project should be public, and we should not be a primary distribution point or main reference. In other words, it should be a project that is already hosted online somewhere, even if it is just github or sourceforge. This way the blogs can be restricted to a reasonably concise description/discussion, including external links to downloads, documentation, etc. If it's proprietary, that's fine, but it should still have a home page. This draws a line such that 'programming diary' style things would not be allowed ("I'm working on whatever, and it's not really done yet...") etc.

We might also consider some kind of optional template. People could use this to structure their blog, but would not be required to use it.

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source | link

I think we should decide on some basic criteria so if someone says, "I want to contribute to the blog," we'll have some basic guidelines to point to.

For example: the project should be public, but we should not be a primary distribution point or main reference. In other words, it should be a project that is already hosted online somewhere, even if it is just github or sourceforge. This way the blogs can be restricted to a reasonably concise description/discussion, including external links to downloads, documentation, etc.

We might also consider some kind of optional template. People could use this to structure their blog, but would not be required to use it.